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deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
think would probably help the city a lot more focusing on education and focusing in terms of economic development. you know, i just have to say -- >> of course his argument is this is critical of a critical public health issue and people who smoke cost millions if not billions of dollars a year. >> but again, sort of return on the time you're going to spend. given the fact that it's not like it is going to stop people from buying vigts. i mean, they can still walk in and purchase them. i just think it is an interesting use of his time and i have to say that i think the city would be better served if he focused on education as opposed to this. >> doug, the head of the new york association of convenience stores is not happy about this. here's what he had to say about it. we think it's patently absurd. can you think of any other retail business licensed to sell legal products that is required to hide them from the view of its customers? he right? >> well, i think that's because the tobacco industry spends about a billion dollars in direct marketing toward -- they make payments to these c
the insurance they need or the subsidies they need to get educated. she is trying to gain sympathies here for rich preppy white house staffers that need to pay $7 for a nice meal in the cafeteria in d.c. and now they want to raise it to $10. is that what i'm getting from her? >> clayton: she says the quality of the food. if you look at the quality of the food, even lowering it it's still better than the school lunches most of our kids get to eat across this country. >> alisyn: you mean mystery meat? [yuck] >> peter: what was that pink slime they had coming out of tube. >> clayton: we used to have cheese dream take hamburger bumps the enriched flour ones break it in half and drizzle cheese ton and melt it and that was lunch. >> alisyn: that sounds delicious. the food i had in my cafeteria completely indefinable. it was just a sort of. >> clayton: jell-o. >> alisyn: gentlemen -- gelatinous. i think it was a kung pow chicken thing. let us know what the most heart breaking sequester cut you have heard is find us on twitter. are you on twitter? the neys are 49. without objection. >> the senate
education, we need to make sure we protect medicare and what we've seen and the alternative is they don't do that. that create as voucher program for medicare. >> we certainly agree on the opposition to a recession. senator corker, you going to vote for this budget? >> no, i'm not. i don't expect you think i would. it really doesn't address any of the major issues that we need to be dealing with. there's no entitlement reform. republicans would like to see a 75 year fix for our entitlements so that we'll see, know those will be here down the road. if you want to know the truth, larry, neither budget does the things that need to be done for our country but i will say two nights ago we passed a cr, first time since i've been in the united states senate in six years and to months. i was able to vote for a bill that cut real spending. we'll go through this budget process and the democratic budget obviously as you just mentioned doesn't do what it needs to do. republican budget could do more, maybe there's a remote chance that we have a conference that actually addresses the big issues of the da
to talk about this bigger issue of how education is changing dramatically in america as we move from textbooks to online learning. and in the past, each state and in texas the state board of education, would review textbooks to be sure the information was right and that there wasn't a bias. and that that textbooks would be distributed and parents could see them. they've been approved. today, we have an onslaught of online products by c-scope, which was not involved in this particular lesson. >> megyn: that's the other that has the agenda in texas. >> right, that's the other entity and now you have safari montage with this video and talked to the state board of education. we've had 1300 bids, up dramatically, from textbook publishers for online curriculum because they're making the transition. now, we obviously want to stay up with technology in our schools. it's less expensive to deliver the product this way. students are more engaged in technology than they are in ready heavy textbooks, but we've lost control, megyn, and this really concerns me. now, safari montage, if you look on t
of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move the party on those issues when you're still dealing with fundamentals in terms of personality. >> a lot of people in the republican party got the message, got those messages at least from the election. and are read
to save you money. my job is not just to entertain you, but i'm trying to teach and educate you so call me, 1-800-743-cnbc. look, maybe it just needs to go lower. that's way thought all day as the market see-sawed. the dow closing down 90 points, s&p back sliding 8.3%. nasdaq falling 0.97%. to me the stock market is represented by the averages. the sum of the evidence that's out there right now about where things are headed in the future. in the last 24 hours, the weight of the evidence has shifted to the negative. unless we get some big breaks here, these negatives will begin to be reflected in the averages beyond where they went out today. you know i've said repeat lid i'm willing to take a pass of the last percent or two of the rally because i don't want to be greedy. bulls make money, bears make money and hogs are slaughtered. i thought it would take out the high inspiring too much short-term euphoria. that hasn't happened, which in itself i find worrisome. i didn't like so many of the loudest bears out there like adam parker, nice guy, morgan stanley, just turned bullish. it did bothe
. so now we have two women on the board. you have to educate women that they shouldn't accept something that doesn't make sense but it is, as a ceo, male or female, you're responsible for doing the right thing and if you're public for your shareholders, which is women represent 55% of the workforce now. so it's crazy not to pay them the same. >> is this going to make an impact, this book? >> i think it has. look at john chambers at cisco putting out a memo to his company saying they haven't done enough. not just on the pay gap but the percentage of women that are at management level. i think it's already made a huge impact. >> let's turn to this tax issue. we have seen amazon deal with it on a state by state basis. the stock hasn't really reflected the sort of lingering concern over state sales tax spp this a game changer for the industry or not? >> well, i think -- i think what's happened is this was supposed to be a few years and it's now been about 20. so i think it was good at the beginning but it's been unfair to other retailers, which is why should -- if either everybody collects
baiting and diminishing his accomplishment, value, core ideology. individual well educated. he fought to get to the position he is. in raised by a single mom. and his brother is a rocket scientist. this is an accomplished famil family. nobody handed anything to him. these are principles. to call him a token is something i find offensive to someone a accomplished. >> eric: it doesn't surprise you that we hear it from the left? >> greg: left wing professors are the most narrow minded people since the kkk. i'm not surprised they call him uncle tom on twitter or token. he is carrier to them then kim jung un, with a finger on the button. this is not about pigment on the skin. it's about thickness. you have to have a thick skin because people will try to destroy you. in the sense the left is saying to blacks, we own you. it's no surprise they are or were the party of slavely. >> eric: it feels like the left is trying to be divisive. if they could put groups and make groups and say we the liberals are for your group, but the republicans aren't, that is what the plan is and what the goal is.
in the head by the taliban for promoting education for girls five months ago. she lives in england now. today she went back to school for the first time since the attack. here's how she described her return to the classroom. >> i think it is the happiest moment that i'm going back to my school. today i have my books, my bag. i will learn. i will talk to my friends. i will talk to my teacher. >> an incredible young girl. >>> an update on another recovery. interior secretary ken salazar said the statue of liberty will re-open by the fourth of july. it was closed in october during super storm sandy. >>> nasa and white house officials said the nation's asteroid detection program is behind schedule and billions of dollars are needed to keep americans safe from space threats like the meteor that exploded over russia last month. more than a thousand people were injured. officials said the risk of a massive meteor slamming into earth any time soon is small. just one in 20,000. here's the bad news, anderson. at least 10,000 large space objects -- one official used the term "city killers" haven't been
, thank you for the education, thanks for the laughs, hash tag mad money. harlem shake, too. yeah, we did a good one. ♪ >> hi, jim, how you doing? >> real good, how about you? >> i got a cold. >> i'm sorry. have you tried z-pack. it kills you but it is also good. >> when i say bo you say yah. boo! >> yah! >> boo! >> yah! >> heather that works for you, she's a swell gal. >> she went to the u. this is about business. you can learn a heck of a lot from monopoly. confidentially, i like to turn the board over and stomp out of the room in tears if i lost. so i don't blame them for letting me win. i bring all this up because you know what we're doing this week, we are playing oligopoly. oligopoly the investing game, we can help try to make you real money. not real money, bogus money. ♪ [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on
the opportunities that maybe more well educated people have. i blame congress in some way, to leaving these people out in the cold. i think there say lesson here. like in sex ed class, they have kids carry around babies so they know what it is like, baby dolls, so they know what it is like to take care of a baby. i think congress should have to carry around 20 something dolls. and if the doll goes below the poverty line, they have to listen to a lecture by nancy pelosi. that's my idea. >> i was waiting, trying to understand where you were going. i'm kind of with you. but actually to your point, this is something i read in this article in the wall street journal, to your point about maybe feeling disenfranchised. many whose jobs do not give them membership in the professional class turn to a traditional source of young adult identity, parenthood, for meaning, for satisfaction, so young women often drift unintentionally into parenthood with men whom they believe are not good enough to marry or not ready for it. so there is a trend here, and it is tougher for middle class americans, but then you look
and ownership. when we're talking about the ability to educate your kid as you define, as you decide as a parent. those types of things really speaks to that much more than anything else in my view. >> michael steele, thank you very much. >> good to be with you. >> thanks for joining us and speaking back. >> and next, the president's trip to israel -- can he mend a strained relationship? >>> and still ahead, proof of citizenship. the supreme court takes up arizona's voter i.d. law today. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. i'm a conservative investor. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. which shirt feels more expensive? i g
and our educational institutions is our attention to the poor and the social justice. he has taken name francis, the apostle of the poor, and has talked about the poor and marginalized ever since he started. i think the theme of poverty and taking care of the poor and as he said on sunday, a church of the poor and for the poor is going to be a theme of his papacy. >> by the way, father martin, i have joe in the second round of the tournament. claudio, you mentioned the dramatic gesture there of the pope getting out of the motorcade and working the crowd like that. i just think the inaugural parade here in the united states when jimmy carter broke with tradition, got out and backed down pennsylvania. how dramatic that was. does that say anything about how the relationship of this pope, with catholic worldwide will be different than the relationship benedict had with them? >> indeed it is. the pope breaks with the rules and breaks with tradition and vatican security as well. on sunday, for instance, he was holding a small mass inside the small parish inside the vatican walls. of course, t
trying to save you the money. my job is not just to entertain you but to educate you so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. too positive? too negative? or maybe positive with a skeptical bent. each day i try to gauge whether i am too optimistic or pessimistic when all i really want to be is an informed skeptic. especially on volatile days like today where the average is see saw, down, close be up four points. s&p slipping 2.4%. this morning on "squawk on the street," we had kind of a philosophical discussion about what's the right tone to offer you, the viewer. brian sullivan discussed the possibility of being too negative, and if you're too negative during the last european bank crisis, you left a huge amount of moolah on the table, enough to have true seller's remorse about the decision. he pondered the notion you can't be so negative you think the world is about to come to an end. even though people who are that pessimistic sound smarter to many who watch. sound smarter. that's right. brian contended that the pessimists somehow come off as more informed and that the optimists are perceived
of law, economic development, education, and health. we consider these to be investments in a future palestinian state. investments in peace, which is in all of our interests. more broadly, in our discussions today i reaffirmed to president apass that the united states remains committed to realizing the vision of two states, which is in the interest of the palestinian people and also in the national security interest of israel, the united states and the world. we seek an independent, viable and contiguous palestinian state as the home land of the palestinian people, alongside the jewish state of israel, two nations enjoying self-determination, security, and peace. as i've said many times, the only way to achieve that goal is through direct negotiations between israelis and palestinians themselves. there is no short cut to a sustainable solution. in our discussion with president abbas, i heard him speak out about the difficult issues that cannot be ignored. among them, problems caused by continued settlement activity, the plight of palestinian prisoners, and access to holy sites in j
born here or came here as very young children. and i think they've participated in our education system, our political system even though they haven't been voting so they've been inform by that. it is natural they would demand their rights because they've been following the political system since they were children, most of them. >> all right. thank you so much for being here. i'm going to send you a copy of my book. >> oh, i can't wait. you got the mention in. >> up next -- i just do it to mention it. >> from the office to playing the field. how to be top dog. apparently it has something to do with the shape of your hands. behind who wins and who loses. keep it on the best show hands down. ♪ [ acoustic guitar: upbeat ] [ dog ] we found it together. on a walk, walk, walk. love to walk. yeah, we found that wonderful thing. and you smiled. and threw it. and i decided i would never, ever leave it anywhere. because that wonderful, bouncy, roll-around thing... had made you play. and that... had made you smile. [ announcer ] beneful. play. it's good for you. mr. wiggles and curling irons. f
% this year. how about apollo group? the for profit education company ripping higher. another name in the green. second quarter profit drops 79%. revenue fell amid lower enrollments. still, results besting the street's expectations. another name we should mention, dollar general, telling us today that sales growth this year could best the strength in 2012. but the company's rival, family dollar, actually slipping. analysts tell me part of the problem here, dollar general now saying it's roll out of tobacco products exceeding expectations. remember, family dollar got into the tobacco business about a year ago. so some worry now about the impact the company might feel. blackberry another name in the red. goldman sachs cutting its rating to neutral on this one. price target 17 bucks. the analysts talking about the disappointing u.s. launch of the new z-10 smartphone. we'll end here on facebook. falling to the lowest level this year, since trading at a six-month high of 32.51 on january 28th. facebook shares down some 20%. sue? back to you. >> thank you very much, josh. >>> we have les
by her father. the 15-year-old was targeted because she spoke up for girl's education in pakistan. malala says she's excited to head back to the classroom. >> i think it is the happiest moment that i am going back to my school. and today i have my books, my bag and i will learn and talk to my friends, i will talk to my teacher. >> imagine, she was shot in the head. >> in the head. >> her recovery has been just extraordinary. she did of course become an international symbol for women's rights because of all of this. even got nominated for the nobel peace prize. >> very precocious young lady. >>> at the vatican, new insight on pope fran tis cis on the iss same sex marriage. >> the "new york times" is reporting the pope has a practical side on this divisive issue. >> and he may be actually open to the notion of civil unions. john allen joining us again from rome. good to see you again, john. "new york times" reporting that then-cardinal bergoglio in 2010 quietly suggested the church come out in support of civil unions. at the same time he was publicly leading the charge against same sex marr
: the education of tom perkins." it is a candid account of his life, his second marriage to romance novelist danielle steel, a manslaughter conviction in a boating accident in france, and the deals that made him so wealthy, starting with the first biotech company, genentech, here in san francisco. he and his partners launched genentech in 1976 with nothing more than a checkbook and an idea. >> the idea was to trick nature into letting us make something that didn't exist in nature -- in particular, human insulin. >> genentech's success led to new ways of treating everything from diabetes to dwarfism, and to getting rich. kleiner perkins' initial investment of $250,000 soared 800-fold to $200 million. >> that's what venture capitalists are created to do, and you can blame converting the orchards of silicon valley into parking lots partly on me and partly on genentech, because we proved that this kind of high-risk, high-tech venture capital could be an enormous home run, and everybody wanted to get in on it, including lots of entrepreneurs, and that's what got this whole silicon valley engine r
international. helping survivors of war and conflict. finance international providing financial education to children around the world. >> that's great. >> right out of the gates, we've got the nasdaq composite down by a little bit more than 1%. feeling the brunt of the losses early on in trading. >> isn't that funny? >> google was, frankly, was there a note last week that they didn't talk about, that google may have trouble making -- look, i'm just pointing out that there is an old -- new tech came under pressure last week at the same time that the western digitals and the sandesk. >> i can say something about google for a second? >> no. i'm sorry. 2 got zero play and nobody cared. i'm the only one that scared now it's ebay. >> and it came out with a big report that basically said in their testing, paid search which is 90% of google's revenue. >> yes. >> made no impact on click through rates or results. that basically free, just being out there with your meditags and everything else was just as good as paid search. it had all of these algorithms and i didn't understand half of it, but i
in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that is in the constitution that you can't raise revenues, i don't know. but it's not right. >> i want to switch gears and talk to you about guns a bit. we just talked about it with our last group of folks. 85% of folks in this country when you ask about background checks they say they support the idea. background checks aren't a done deal. looks like the assault weapons ban is not going to happen. ban on high capacity clips is probably not going to happen. why is there such a, a gap between what folks say they want in terms of gun control and what you guys down in d.c. are willing to do? >> i may get trouble for this, but i don't think that 85% of americans have the slightest idea who their member of congress is or that they vote for them, or that short of their life depending on it, that they know how to get in touch with them in order to express their feelings. one thing is xleclear. the gun manufacturers and national rifl
for him to educate people and in these red states where i live in south georgia, we don't need the education from michael bloomberg about our guns, rights to guns. most are in favor of some type of backgrund checks. in georgia, to have a carry permit, you have one. the devil is in the details. i'm not confident in eric holder and the department of justice to implement laws, new laws on the books when he won't even enforce the current gun laws on the books. >> so does patrick have something here that mayor bloomberg's reputation as a guy who runs a nanny state or tries to, does he really have any sway over people who are on the fence? >> this is a political red herring. oh, this week it's michael bloomberg and it used to be nancy pelosi and it used to be barack obama. you can use all the scary liberal names, but the reality on the ground, police who don't tend to vote democratic, even police are in favor of what the mayors are suggesting. michael bloomberg maying t be t face, but he's speaking for mayors there cleveland, from detroit, from indianapolis. mayors who are saying i n
customer. >> that's the absolutely right thing to do. a lack of education is terrible and doesn't bode well for a great financial future. >> alisyn: by the time they're ten years old. it's time to talk about interest, loan, time horizon and inflation, and taxes. what is that? >> now we're getting the bigger words here, alisyn. interest, the money that you paid for them. anybody lending you money, the loan when you borrow money for things like a car and teenagers may need a loan if they're getting close to those times and inflation, just that things get more costly over time and you have to, obviously, account for that in taxes and we're all familiar with those. >> alisyn: so you're explaining all this have to your ten-year-old, even if it's not applicable to their life yet. you're telling them what's on the horizon. >> exactly. >> alisyn: let's talk about 15 years old and this is where i think things get serious and you have the baby-sitting money and you have some stuff that you want to buy. so, you say investing, allocation asset. diversification, stock funds. >> i'm so happy we're doing
taxes, limited regulation. job creation, pension reform, education reform. this is working and it's getting results for people and that's what people want. they want government to work well and stay out of their way and spend their money wisely and that's what governors do. martha: that is one of the big questions. reince priebus talked about reaching out to groups like the naacp and la raza and there is an editorial this morning in "the national review" which disagrees with that notion. says no. actually what conservatives need to do is prove to hispanics why they have a better way of helping people of helping the middle class. what do you think? >> i don't think those are inconsistent. we need to stick to our principles. if we become more like the democratic party, they don't need us. we have bright colors that reagan talked about which is what we stand for on taxes, regulation, spending life, family. marriage, other things like that, that are pillars of the republican party. but then i think they're right. show people of all ethnicities, of income stratus, show why the principl
know, in france and in europe, the level of education for people is very high. so we have a very, very strong, you know, population to work. we have very strong infrastructure. so it's also a big place to invest. >> are you a supporter of holland and some of the things he's done? >> well, you know, they've done a few things. i would love to have more to be done, to be done because i think, again, france needs to be more attractive. >> are you rooming with -- >> i thought he was in russia now. >> even though he's an honorary citizen. >> we have a lot of business in europe, in russia, actually, and we are citizens of the world. >> that's a good answer. >> that's a good answer. >> very slippery. >> you spent a lot of time on diversity in women. >> yeah. >> and women in the workplace, given cheryl samberg's new book is a real issue. >> yeah. >> have you read the book? >> no, i've not read the book, but i've heard about the book, yep. >> the reason i ask -- >> what were you going to say? >> i have another question when you're done. >> the reason i was going to ask was whether you agree with
public accountants. i said, listen, you're an educated guy. you must have had a lot of wealthy clients and business people. here's what he said. >> all the assurances they get from european officials was that their deposits are not at risk. there may be other need for additional taxes for significant government cuts. the loans actually supports their banking system. but there was never discussion of any cut on depolisitsdeposit >> in other words, they were expecting traditional types of austerity. when we have more news we'll get it to you. >> let's cross over to moscow with steve sedgwick. we used to be colleagues in london for a long time. i know you've done a lot of reporting in moscow. isn't it the case that the russians will string the cypriots along here? they will get much more if they need to when the banking system collapses if that's where we're headed. surely. >> yeah, simon, you make a very good point. there's a lot of people thinking, what's the gain? they've already let the money back in 2011, they led with 2.5 billion euros. so extending that and the term on that, reduci
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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